Where's Woolly? Knitted covers on bollards across London intrigue passers-by and highlight Space for Cycling campaign

Sometimes it takes a fun stunt to highlight a serious message... 

This week, we've been decorating bollards with knitted covers across London (see above), highlighting the importance of removing through motor traffic from many more of London's residential streets.

Removing through motor traffic is one of the key policies of the London Cycling Campaign's Space for Cycling local election campaign.

We're encouraging all Londoners to email their local election candidates calling for Space for Cycling in their area.

Bollards in Lewisham, Soho, Bloombury and Hackney have benefited from a knitted makeover, and the reception has been great so far: 

Removing through motor traffic and reducing motor traffic speed to 20mph are the best measures to provide local neighbourhoods with safe Space for Cycling.

TAKE ACTION: Add your voice to the 15,000 messages already sent to local election candidates

Living in Greater London, we’re so used to seeing bollards in the street that we rarely think much about their purpose. 

But the fact is making streets access-only for motor vehicles – using bollards, planters or gates – can transform the character and safety of a residential street, and reduced speeds are proven to save lives.

Rat-running motor traffic causes unnecessary danger and reduces the quality of life for hundreds of thousands of Londoners every day, robbing communities of safety and calmness in local streets. 

“Oh, that’s just part of living in a city, isn’t it?” we hear some people complain, but we disagree – residential streets should be designed around local people, with the test of their success being whether they’re safe enough for kids to play in. 

Closing off streets to through motor traffic using bollards is the ideal solution for many local residential streets because:

  • it creates people-friendly streets by removing non-local motor traffic
  • walkers and cyclists can still pass through, encouraging local journeys
  • it costs far less than many other street engineering measures
  • everyone can still access to their property by car, including residents and deliveries
  • there's zero effect on street parking 

Don’t take our word for it, though: just ask anyone who lives in a street that has had through motor traffic removed and has seen their environment transformed or their kids get the chance to cycle and play safely outdoors.

TAKE ACTION: Add your voice to the 15,000 messages already sent to local election candidates

So where's Woolly?

This week we've posted our knitted bollard covers at the following locations:

We also have a mystery mobile knitted bollard, which will be making guest appearances at key locations throughout London... watch this space!

Replies

  • By paul at 04:41pm 23 Apr 2014

Of course what we really need are bollards that can be unofficially placed where councils haven't got round to it ( ; ) )

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