Parking in cycle lanes

We've all been there! You're cycling along in the cycle lane minding your own business, dodging the broken bottles, ironmongery and the pedestrians [who step off the pavement into the cycle lane without looking and then look for cars and lorries]; when you come across a car(s) parked blocking the cycle lane. You are then forced to move out putting you potentialy into conflict with other road users.Is it time for a concerted campaign across all cycling organisations to remedy this problem? After all there is the legislation already out there. We just need enforcement!

Replies

Enforcement is organised at the borough level and, with some noteable exceptions, they are fairly hot in Islington. Shouldn't campaigning be organised at borough level?

Hi John.

Yes Islington Council are good (fairly), but we don't all cycle in Islington. Greenwich, Bexley, Hackney, Newham and Tower Hamlets are terrible in large parts.

Ever since the police ceased to be responsible for the policing of parking the problem of cycle lane obstruction has got worse and worse.

I feel this problem has to be tackled on a wider basis than just borough level as we don't just cycle in one borough. This problem is country wide (Manchester, Bradford and Hull are very bad), this is why I suggested a concerted effort across all cycling organisations. What happens in the capital tends to be followed across the rest of the country.

Actually it's not always illegal to park in a cycle lane. It's only illegal if the lane is marked with a solid line (in which case a car may not enter it) (or possibly if it's got a solid painted surface, iirc) or if there's other parking restrictions in place (in which case a car must abide by those). Away from junctions typical, painted dashed line lane without a special surface and with no yellow/red lines is fair game (from a legal perspective) for those looking to park somewhere.

Further to N1's reply, am I right in thinking that some cycle lanes are actually designated as 'dual-use'? I see a lot of lanes in Croydon that actually have car parking spaces overlayed on top of them, which kind of defeats the object...

As a general rule of thumb a solid line is enforcable and a dashed line is guidance. In the case of cyclelanes a solid line means motor-vehicles keep out; dashed line means that you are likely to find cycles here.

A good case in point is Byward Street, EC3. Westbound a dashed line. Eastbound a solid line and often a policeman stopping motorcycles at the top of the hill.

My personal bugbear is Plumstead Road, SE18 westbound between Walmer Terrace and Burrage Road. This cyclelane is not marked by a white line(either dashed or solid) but by a line of granit sets and seems to be regarded as fair game by motorists wishing to park, particularly at the eastern end.

Does anyone else have a favourite?

Barking and Degenham has lots of cycle lanes but they all seem to be blocked by cars even though people have driveways and the council has marked parking spaces on the pavment.

Barking and Degenham has lots of cycle lanes but they all seem to be blocked by cars even though people have driveways and the council has marked parking spaces on the pavment.

Barking and Degenham has lots of cycle lanes but they all seem to be blocked by cars even though people have driveways and the council has marked parking spaces on the pavment.

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