With a history going back 30 years, there's no shortage of past glories we can call our own

Road danger reduction

We were promoting ideas such as 20mph speed limits over a decade ago when they were considered radical. Now they're commonplace and the default residential area speed limit in several boroughs.

Similarly, in the 1990s when 'road safety' meant keeping kids indoors and wrapping cyclists in bigger headgear and more high-viz, we were promoting real road danger reduction: a committment to removing the danger from motor vehicles, not blaming the victims

At the same time we’ve helped promote professional standards for cycle training, and our constant lobbying helped ensure that every child in London has free access to cycle training, and all adults also enjoy free or subsidised training from their borough council.

And it's thanks to us, working with other campaigners such as CTC, that helmet-wearing isn't compulsory in the UK. Every few years, another well-meaning but misguided Member of Parliament tries to get compulsion (rather than free choice, which we support) onto the statute books, and we use our knowledge and experience to win the arguments. It's happened before, and we'll probably have to do it again.

London Cycling Maps

In the 2000s we worked with then mayor Ken Livingstone to produce the London Cycling Guides, free maps of to help cyclists, of which several million have been given out in the last decade. These immensely successful maps – which are still going strong – would not have been possible without the detailed local knowledge of LCC members who put advised on the cycle routes. Thanks to LCC members you can get a map showing recommended cycle routes for every part of London.

Fending off misguided laws

It’s thanks to us, working with other campaigners such as CTC, that helmet-wearing isn't compulsory in the UK.

Every few years, another well-meaning but misguided Member of Parliament tries to get compulsion (rather than choice, which we support) on to the statute books - we use our knowledge and experience to win the arguments, especially making the case that compulsion will reduce public health and hence actually increase early deaths.

It's happened before, and we'll probably have to deal with it again.

Another recurring battle is when authorities demand new laws to impound bikes parked to street furniture.

Only a couple years ago, we fought in the House of Lords and won, making sure your bikes won't be removed without warning by your local council. It wasn't the first time, and it might not be the last.

And when Ken Livingstone seriously brought up bike registration when he was mayor, we were the ones who countered the proposal with rational arguments.

Back in the day

As far back as the dark days (for cycling at least) of the 70s, when LCC was formed, we were promoting cycling as a normal mode of transport when most people thought it was only for kids, the impoverished and cranks.

Our members took part in some of the earliest street protests against the notion that the purpose of transport policy to enable more and more people to drive cars, more often.

These protests included (and still include) the monthly Criticial Mass.

We were one of the first campaign groups to articulate the idea that walking cycling and public transport should be prioritised over car use to help London become a safer, greener, more cohesive and pleasant city.

We were the ones callling for the hideous one-way systems of the 1970s to be scrapped, years before the politicians realised the truth in our words.

The Shoreditch triangle around Old Street was made two-way again after years of lobbying from our members in Hackney.

Dangerous gyratories are now being made two-way again regularly: with New Cross Gate, Brixton and Tottenham Hale the most recent examples.