Candidates in our 2012 trustee election answer questions chosen by our members

The three most popular questions from our members for the 18 candidates standing in our trustee election were:

  1. How can we strengthen our local campaigning?
  2. How can we increase our membership?
  3. What messaging could we put out to reduce risk for cyclists?

We gave each candidate 100 words to answer three questions, giving them the option to concentrate on one topic if they chose. For more information about the candidates, read their full profiles here.

Q1: How can we strengthen our local campaigning?

Rachel Aldred 
My contribution will be creating a London-based academic network speaking for cycling and using research to help evaluate and shape policy interventions.

David Arditti
There is a case for putting local groups on a more professional footing by making the posts of borough co-ordinator a part-time paid job. This way LCC could ensure activity in every borough.

Catharine Bull
Work with key local people to promote cycling. Regular sessions in local shopping areas and supermarkets. Work with local trade associations.

Charles Barraball
By galvanising local groups and positively promoting their collaboration. 

Suzanne Fogg
Local campaigning should draw on the huge support for a more liveable London, building local alliances with colleges, shops, businesses and councils to achieve many small wins.

Melanie Grech
Uniform branding and websites and practices; modelled on successful groups and activity. Rename local groups so that it’s obvious that they represent LCC.

Kristian Gregory
The LCC should target the weakest borough in terms of campaigning strength and membership and transform it into a powerful campaigning group with high membership. This could happen by running a hyper-local campaign targeting local cyclists, cycling organisations and schools to boost membership and identify and train local cycling champions to form an effective campaigning team. Once done, the LCC should move on to the next weak borough.

Jono Kenyon
Give local groups access to the local members’ emails to begin an interaction. Ask local members for feedback on current local LCC schemes, and what they would like to see done in their area.

Ewa Kwolek
LCC needs to become more relevant and visible in order to grow their following and strengthen local campaigns.Local activities could be made more impactful by for example setting up more roadside memorials in local communities (white ghost bikes).

David Love
Help local groups to hold borough open days. Meet with Councillors and officers. Set up active travel forums and push for regular engagement on cycling issues.

Thomas Robert McGowran
Guerilla marketing. There are plenty of ways to get your branding out there, increase brand awareness. Channel people to the website where the information is. I have done enough events where London cyclists have never heard of the LCC.

Jon Magidsohn
We need stronger links with local, independent bike shops, where we could have posters, campaign ads and host events. Shop owners could subsequently be incentivised to enlist LCC members. 

Jon Parker
To strengthen local campaigns, groups should be free to prioritise their own campaigns, but receive support from the centre and other groups on how to engage with local councillors, MPs and media to achieve their goals.

Paul Ryan
Ask members what they want, encouraging local campaigns with neighboring borough groups. Potential strong campaigners could be interested in issues in boroughs they cycle through, and not live in. 

Oliver Schick
More training for activists and support for local groups; a ‘Vision for London’ (using an advanced mapping database to coordinate everyone contributing their vision for locations); and our 2014 election campaign.

Michael Stock
Campaign with at least two LCC active members in each borough ward willing to campaign, attending events and groups and most importantly making contact with Traffic Engineers and Ward Councilors to ensure LCC shapes the agenda and is listened to and reported to.

Ray Whitehouse
By teaching, supporting and enabling the local groups to know who the right decision makers are, and by helping them deliver a consistent and effective campaign message across London which is localised and meaningful for each council.

Claire Wren
I’d like to see more capacity support for local groups. Many are very effective, but reviving a group that is dormant is a daunting challenge. Support to become more active will help overcome this initial hurdle.

Q2: How can we increase our membership?

Rachel Aldred
Go Dutch indicates the potential for LCC to use clear, specific demands to attract new audiences, activate the membership, and evaluate policy promises and outcomes. Learning from Go Dutch and the wider upsurge in cycling advocacy will be crucial.

David Arditti
LCC should do its utmost to become a household name to all Londoners. This means that every time there is anything related to cycling in the London and national media, we need to get the name in there.

Catharine Bull
New ways of distributing membership information: send to all beneficiaries of the ‘Ride to Work’ scheme within London; work with major events organisers to provide secure bike parking at events and advertise LCC; hold impromptu ‘roadside’ events providing services to cyclists including Dr Bike.

Charles Barraball
By continuing to raise LCC's positive profile.

Suzanne Fogg
To increase membership, LCC must increase its visibility amongst Londoners. It should build on the Big Ride success with fancy dress/themed fun rides for all ages. LCC could use 10 branded box-bikes for young families to show how easy it is, promote more ‘led rides’ and ‘buddies’ for new cyclists.  

Melanie Grech
Relationships with British Cycling, CTC and Sustrans that demonstrate co-ordinated and efficient campaigning. Cost-effective membership for people that need to be a member of British Cycling and want to support LCC. A closer link between organisations encouraging cycling in London communities and LCC membership. 

Jono Kenyon
Have a Christmas membership campaign, promoting gift membership as a stocking-filler, purchasable via bikeshops. Have a discounted rate for new cyclists (tied in to shops/bike2work) 

Ewa Kwolek
Tangible membership benefits should be made much more prominent (the great advice on safety and cycling regulations, free legal help and insurance and equipment discounts). 

David Love
Shout campaign “wins” from the rooftops. Give incentives for students and families. Offer consultancy to corporate members and special rates to their employees.

Thomas Robert McGowran
Offer different levels of membership, sliding scale. Increasing effective saving/benefits the person can make. Cost of membership needs to start low to make it less exclusive. Offer membership to new bike owners as a purchase incentive or included in the Cycle to Work scheme.

Jon Magidsohn
LCC should better communicate to the wider public – through actions cards and digital means – about the benefits of membership and the value of participating in campaigns.

Jon Parker
LCC has to become as mainstream as cycling itself has become. To inspire members, we need a clear statement of what we're trying to achieve, why we want to achieve it and how we're going to achieve it.

Paul Ryan
Winter Bike to Work Week in December: meet and talk to cyclists, hand out food, the magazine and free stuff, and first get people involved on a lower level (emails) before strengthening the commitment at a later date (membership). Encourage Barclays Bike members to join. 

Oliver Schick
Lower the basic membership fee and have a more modular membership offer; developing a stronger web presence in social media (forum, better communications); enhancing our internal democracy through a more open groups model.

Michael Stock
Grow by (1) member-get-members recruitment, supported by LCC flyers/cards; (2) retailer-publicity with stand-out displays in shops; (3) business-promotion by employers to push the benefits of cycling as part of their CSR activity – and all with cycling celebs endorsement!

Ray Whitehouse
By being seen as the leader for safer cycling across London and working with other organisations to encourage more cyclists no matter where they live, how old they are, or whatever their ability or ethnicity. More cyclists who know about LCC means more members.

Claire Wren
Increased membership will follow from being an effective advocate for cycling. Our focus should be on being the best organisation possible, raising the issues and raising the profile of LCC... members will follow. 

Q3: What LCC messaging could help reduce risk for cyclists?

Rachel Aldred
Disproportionate injury risks are a social justice issue: London cyclists face a 30 times higher KSI (killed & seriously injured) risk per km than car travellers (the Dutch ratio is 4:1).

David Arditti
I don’t think what LCC says can directly influence risk to cyclists. We need to continue, strengthen and clarify further the Go Dutch campaign.

Catharine Bull
Cyclists have to be doubly aware. Public highways are shared spaces and we are all doing the same thing, going about our daily lives, using different means of transport. Establish a ‘I am bike aware’ sticker and issue to PSV operator’s licence holders who attend a bike awareness course. 

Charles Barraball
Share the space we all pay for.

Suzanne Fogg
Public messages should focus on safer streets for everyone: ‘Nothing you are rushing to today is worth knocking over a child walking to school or a mother cycling to work’.  

Melanie Grech
Research shows that the biggest problem is bad driving.Cyclists are doing us all, and our children, a favour; reducing congestion, pollutants and C02. We need to protect these angels of the road.

Kristian Gregory
The vast majority of cyclist injuries are the fault of motorists, so the LCC should focus on the urban redesign needed to prevent motorists from injuring cyclists. 

Jono Kenyon
The issue of air-quality should be raised. A systematic campaign for the reduction of air-pollution, which kills thousands of Londoners annually, through an increase in safe provision for cycling and encouraging new cyclists to the streets, would broaden the reach of LCC across London life

Ewa Kwolek
Tougher measures should be made for those who breach cycling codes of conduct (eg, fines for crossing red lights or using earphones while cycling) to reduce the risk of injury.

David Love
To cyclists: take your space in the road; stay clear of HGVs; stop at red. To drivers: give cyclists at least a metre when passing; get out and ride.

Thomas Robert McGowran
Cyclists, make sure you are seen on the road, be bright, dress smart.  

Jon Magidsohn
Public messages should not portray cyclists as 'others', but promote the idea that cycling helps everyone – reducing traffic, helping the environment.  With TFL and the police, LCC should develop campaigns that educate motorists and pedestrians, as opposed to fining cyclists, which needlessly demonizes them. 

Jon Parker
A Think Bike!-style campaign would encourage drivers to consider cyclists not just other drivers, and we should promote the benefits that 20mph zones bring to communities as a whole.

Paul Ryan
Encourage defensive cycling to the public including: the lorry/intersection campaign; wearing bright clothing and lights; using cycle routes if possible.

Oliver Schick
Equally clearly state that cycling is not ‘dangerous’ and communicate our strong desire to reduce crashes. Danger of left-turning HGVs. Promote cycle training, especially for drivers.

Michael Stock
Reduce injury with a message that builds on Go Dutch: Smart Cycling - Zero Deaths – Share the Road.

Ray Whitehouse
To all road users (drivers, cyclists and pedestrians); Be considerate, follow the rules, respect others and keep yourself safe.

Claire Wren
While injury is an important issue, I like to focus on the positive benefits of cycling: fit, free, fast and fun. With more cyclists, we’ll have more advocates for cycle safety.